23/Oct/2018

Sun exposure at work could lead to one skin cancer death a week, according to researchers based at Imperial College London.

They further estimate that there are 48 deaths and 241 cases of melanoma skin cancer each year in Britain caused by ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun at work.

Dr Lesley Rushton, lead researcher from Imperial College London, said: “We’ve shown previously that people often don’t understand the risks of damage caused by sun in the UK.  But this research shows you don’t have to work in the Mediterranean or a traditionally sunny country for the sun to damage your skin”.


23/Oct/2018

Children with prolonged vitamin D deficiency in the first decade of life are more likely to develop asthma and allergies, according to a new study.

It has also revealed a “dark side” to the highly successful anti-skin cancer messaging, says Professor Katie Allen, of the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute.


23/Oct/2018

Uninsured, immigrant and minority communities in the United States may not be as aware of skin cancer as they should be, a recent study suggests, Reuters reports:

“At a medical clinic in southern Florida, researchers surveyed members of these communities and found that nearly 25 percent had never heard of skin cancer, or melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, and almost 21 percent believed – incorrectly – that dark skinned people were immune to the disease.”


23/Oct/2018

There is an ongoing need for physicians to educate their patients about the need for protection against both UV-A and UV-B radiation in preventing skin cancer and sunburns, a 20015 study from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine suggests:

“Despite the recent changes in labeling mandated by the US Food and Drug Administration, this survey study suggests that the terminology on sunscreen labels may still be confusing to consumers. Furthermore, consumers may hold misconceptions about the factors important in a sunscreen, including a common over-reliance on the SPF value”, according to the author, Roopal V. Kundu, MD, Department of Dermatology.


23/Oct/2018

According to a study published online in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology on July 28, although melanoma incidence is higher in Caucasians, patients with skin of color are less likely to survive the disease.

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland utilized the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database to study nearly 97,000 patients diagnosed with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, from 1992 to 2009. Although Caucasian patients had the highest melanoma incidence rate, they also had the best overall survival rate, followed by Hispanic patients and patients in the Asian American/Native American/Pacific Islander group.


23/Oct/2018

we all need to start thinking about and taking action right away, according to Cancer Research UK.

Did you for example know that sunscreen is not the best way to protect yourself, and that you can actually get a sunburn on cloudy days?


23/Oct/2018

You are not alone, according to a new study. Even though people may be more careful in the sun after skin cancer, having had a malignancy still doesn’t convince everybody to take basic precautions like wearing hats or sunscreen, a recent U.S. study suggests.

Even with history of skin cancer, though, only 54 percent of people used sunscreen. That’s better than just 33 percent among people without a history of skin cancer, but still leaves a lot of people unprotected from sun damage.


23/Oct/2018

According to a new American Academy of Dermatology survey, 71 percent of 18- to 34-year-old women know that there is no such thing as a healthy tan, and 66 percent know that getting a base tan is not a healthy way to protect themselves from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays. The survey also indicates that these women understand what’s at risk when they tan, as 98 percent know that skin cancer can be deadly.


23/Oct/2018

for your body’s vitamin D production, according to a new study in Brazil:

“Even people exposed to high levels of sunlight may be deficient in serum vitamin D because it is mainly induced by UV irradiation and synthesized in the skin”.